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urban planning

CBR cycling: we have a plan

Building a network of good cycle paths is not easy, but the ACT Government has a plan.

The “CBR Cycle Routes” are a network of cycle routes between Canberra’s town centres. They do not all exist yet, and if people do not know about them, they almost certainly never will. Cycle paths are not built without community support.

Background to the urban planning process is found here.

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In the Active Travel Framework, the “CBR Cycle Routes” are known as Main Community Routes. Local Community Routes are planned within suburbs to schools and shops.

The online Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool shows you the existing and intended Main and Local Community Routes. It is an urban planning tool, “created to provide timely route information for planners, developers and facility designers.”

Issues with the Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool are discussed here.

The Plan

Starting with an example: a photo of part of the CBR Cycle Route C5, and below that what the ACT Government map of the route looks like.

CBR Cycle Route C5, Aranda Nature Reserve, Aranda hill, Canberra.
CBR Cycle Route C5, Aranda Nature Reserve, Aranda hill, Canberra.
CBR Cycle Routes enlargement C5 and C10, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool
CBR Cycle Routes enlargement C5 and C10, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool

The complete network of paths covers all of Canberra.

CBR Cycle Routes, Building an integrated transport network active travel 2015, ACT Government.
CBR Cycle Routes, Building an integrated transport network active travel 2015, ACT Government, page 51.

Currently these are the routes planned.

CBR Cycle Routes index, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool
CBR Cycle Routes index, Building an integrated transport network active travel 2015, ACT Government, page 51.

The online tool

The Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool shows more than just routes and is derived from the ACT Government planning tool ACTmapi.

Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool https://activeinfrastructure.net.au/
Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool

The community routes are a hierarchy of Principal, Main and Local Community Routes. As this is a planning tool, not all the paths currently exist. The tool includes the planning status: endorsed, intended and future. Endorsed plans are signed off, intended are likely to eventuate, and future, well,… who knows.

Community Routes, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool
Community Routes, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool

Two further types, Accessible Pedestrian Routes (wheel chairs, no bikes) and On-Road Cycling Routes (cycle lanes), are worth mentioning.

Accessible Pedestrian Routes (no bikes) and On-Road Cycling Routes, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool

“Destinations” in the Active Travel Framework are places we ride to, including shopping centres and schools.

Town and group centres, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool
Town and group centres, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool

We need to ride across roads safely. A zebra crossing is laid out for pedestrians but can be used by cyclists (10 km/h). The priority crossing is found on Main Community Routes and bikes have the priority over cars.

active travel, ACT, Australia, Australia, Active Travel Facilities Design - Municipal Infrastructure Standards 05
Path Priority crossing of a local access street Location: Lyneham, ACT. Inset detail shows crossing area speed hump and ACT linemarking detail. Active Travel Facilities Design Municipal Infrastructure Standards 05, page 56
Lights, underpasses, zebra and priority crossing, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool
Lights, underpasses, zebra and priority crossing, Active Travel Infrastructure Practitioner Tool

Key documents

There are three important documents for active travel.

Cover of Building an Integrated Transport Network: Active Travel (aka. Active Travel Framework)
ACT Government, urban planning, ACT, Australia
The cover of Planning for Active Travel in the ACT: Active Travel Infrastructure Interim Planning Guideline
ACT Government, urban planning, ACT, Australia
The cover 2019 Active Travel Facilities Design Municipal Infrastructure Standards 05

10 replies on “CBR cycling: we have a plan”

During 2009, I was asked by Pedal Power to contemplate NAMES for cycle routes to put to the ACT Govt Street naming committee. I did a fair amount of research on characters/people in cycling that would resonate with cyclists. I also did a lot towards mapping the routes between town centres etc. I did a presentation to the Naming committee who told me the bike paths are SHARED paths and to find some walkers/runners to include in the list. I was out of puff after spending another month wrestling with finding suitable candidates…and gave up. There was already some action in the ACT Govt at that time towards TRUNK ROUTE identification, unbeknownst to me, so Ifelt a bit deflated. HOWEVER I still have my files on route names. I was told that urban naming follows a fairly strict protocol so that emergency services can easily identify just where someone is when the need arises. the test is that when you start to enter a street name or locality the first 4 characters gude the location search in the country you are in.No street name is repeated anywhere exacty in Canberra.
Anyone interested in this issue??

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I do not know what Pedal Power is doing now. Pedal Power has been vocal about the ACT Government COVID response recently. The ATIPT seems to be the ACT Government’s plan for now. The other key documents for active travel are listed at the end of this post.

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