Cycling: safety in numbers

Photo by Vladimir Blyufer on Pexels.com

Cycling is a cultural phenomenon as much as anything. On a bike, we have a much closer connection to our environment and Mother Nature. Safety is a concern for many. For those in low cycling countries, it is justified. But there is safety in numbers. The more people experience the joy of cycling, the safer it gets.

Valencia, Spain; 6th May 2020: People walking and playing sports.
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Remember: most cyclists are drivers, too, and can be positive role models on our roads. Slow down for cyclists and give them the space they need to be safe. Be the change you want to see in the world! Gandhi

Netherlands, Denmark and Germany have high cycling participation rates and are safer for it.

More cyclists in a country mean fewer fatal crashes“, Niall McCarthy, Statista, 25/2/2015, accessed 19/8/2020

“Deaths among cyclists in the United States are trending upwards as commuting rises, increasing from 621 in 2010 to 722 in 2012. However, an OECD report suggests that the more cyclists a country has, the fewer fatalities it will tend to experience. Why? In an environment where bicycles and the infrastructure to support them are plentiful, awareness will be high. By contrast, a lone cyclist in a traffic choked urban environment is far more likely to end up in an accident, due to motorists who may not be aware/used to his or her presence.”

More cyclists in a country mean fewer fatal crashes, Niall McCarthy, Statista, 25/2/2015, accessed 19/8/2020

This is good news, for just getting out there on a bike is good for safety.

Photo by Tanathip Rattanatum on Pexels.com
Photo by Tanathip Rattanatum on Pexels.com

Statista

Statista is a wonderful source of free online data, shown graphically, on pretty much everything. Learn about the world, check out Statista!

Source: “More cyclists in a country mean fewer fatal crashes“, Niall McCarthy, Statista, 25/2/2015, accessed 19/8/2020

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

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