Community paths and the Conservation Council

For cycling and walking, little had changed since the 2016 election. What makes sense then still makes sense now. The slow rate of progress is a major issue. The ACT Government says they would like to do this sort of thing but there is still much to be done.

“Walking infrastructure must receive adequate funding. Only two in five Canberra households have direct access to a footpath to take them to school, shops, bus stops or shared cycling/walking paths. Another two households in five have to cross a road to get to their nearest footpath. One household in five doesn’t have a footpath along its street.”

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016
Canberra.bike. Data sourced from Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016.

The Conservation Council

The Conservation Council has developed election policies in the lead-up to the 15 October 2016 ACT Legislative Assembly election in order to set out some environmental issues for the candidates to consider as they campaign and set out their own policies. Here is our policy: Transport – connecting people and places.

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016
Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com
Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com

Transport – connecting people and places

“We need a have an integrated transport policy. Canberra residents should have the option to live without a car, connected to employment, services and activities including journeys to local shops, schools and services. It’s time for an integrated transport plan that uses all modes to provide Canberra with environmentally sustainable, socially equitable transport to support a healthy community. The plan must have specific, measurable targets for all forms of travel that deliver a city where living without a car is a viable, attractive option for most residents.

Active travel should be a key part of the Integrated Transport Plan. There should be a place-making approach with the planning hierarchy of walking first, cycling second, public transport third and driving private vehicles last throughout the ACT, in particular within five kilometres of town and group centres.[i]

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016

[i] ACT Government, Statement of Planning Intent, 2015, p6

Photo by Baskin Creative Studios on Pexels.com
Photo by Baskin Creative Studios on Pexels.com

Active transport needs to integrate with public transport; for example, all buses and rail have capacity to carry bicycles in ways that do not deter other passenger. Transport systems need to be accessible to people with disability as well as older people and parents who have children in prams. Transport needs to address diverse communities.

Cycling and walking infrastructure should be safe, attractive, quick, convenient and maintained to the same standard as roads and should offer a choice of facility appropriate to the needs and abilities of different riders.”

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Develop Integrated Transport Plan where living without a car is a viable option

A new Integrated Transport Plan: based on key objectives from other core Government policy areas such as health, social inclusion and equity. Transport planning should aim to provide adequate weekday and weekend travel without the need to own a car.

Governance: Transport Canberra to employ policy and implementation staff with real world expertise in similar transport change processes where significant modal shift was achieved. …”

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

“Achieve mode shift targets

Active transport targets: 60% of Canberrans walking, riding or using public transport to travel to work by 2030, walking 10%, cycling 30%, public transport 20%.

Measure non-work travel: establish a mechanism to regularly measure non-work travel.”

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016
Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Pexels.com
Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Pexels.com

Active transport for a healthy community and a healthy city

Walking: All people (almost) walk and all journeys have a component of walking

Identify and resource priority walking infrastructure, projects and policies. Footpaths need to serve diverse community needs including people with disability as well as older people and parents who have children in prams.

Cycling for commuting, recreation, sport and travel

Identify and resource priority cycling infrastructure, cost-effective projects and policies: next generation trunk cycle ways having complete separation from vehicles and pedestrians in arterial road corridors with grade-separated crossings of high-speed arterials. Develop local routes for people to cycle to local schools, shops, services and friends

Transport – connecting people and places, The Conservation Council, 19 Jul 2016

Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com
Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com

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