TCCS maintenance targets compared

There are maintenance targets for roads and maintenance targets for paths. How do they compare? We need to distinguish between filling potholes and resurfacing. Needless to say, resurfacing is better. Similarly, community paths can be repaired superficially, or resurfaced or replaced. Unlike roads, paths are quite thin and replacement and resurfacing are quite similar processes.

If we were going to make a comparison, it would be best to compare similar with similar:

  • number of pothole repairs on roads with patch repairs on paths
  • resurfacing of roads with resurfacing of paths.

Last time we checked, potholes were measured in dollar value of work. In comparison, community path repairs are counted per intervention (comparable to counting potholes repaired). The best repair is resurfacing. We would expect a lot less resurfacing than filling potholes, as filling potholes is cheaper and easier than resurfacing.

The paths

ACT Transport is responsible for 2655 km of concrete paths and 390 km of asphalt paths. The widths vary from very narrow to wide.

Total length (km) of ACT Transport paths by surface and path type. Data: “Footpaths in the ACT 2019”, Community Paths in the ACT 2019, Open Data Portal dataACT

The maintenance

The maintenance of the paths depends on the surface type. Concrete and asphalt have quite different characteristics and maintenance is therefore handled differently. For concrete the most common repair method is grinding defects, and for asphalt applying cold mix.

2.1 The works consist of the following;
• Grinding trip hazards on concrete paths that have a height differential ranging from 10 mm to 35 mm,
• Rectification of trip hazards on concrete paths that have a height differential greater than 35mm at the direction of the Principal.
• Rectification of trip hazards using cold-mix asphalt (asphalt and concrete path) (up to 1m2) with or without slab breakout as required; and
• Rectification of trip hazards due to pothole(s) using cold-mix (up to 1m2) on asphalt community paths as required

“Statement of Requirements (SOR)”, 31014-NCT-01 SoR Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards FINAL, tender 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, TCCS, released 29 July 2021, access 17 August 2021. 2.

From the 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, 31014 Path Safety Hazards Addendum 1, we know:

that the defects quantity varies each financial year. However, the works completed in the previous 2 financial years are:
2020-2021
Number of path grinding defects = 777
Number of Asphalt placement (cold mix) = 2,118
2019-2020
Number of path grinding defects= 1,111
Number of Asphalt placement (cold mix) = 1314

31014 Path Safety Hazards Addendum 1, tender 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, TCCS, released 29 July 2021, access 17 August 2021. 2.
SurfaceFY2020FY2021total by surface
asphalt131421183432
concrete11117771888
total by year242528955320
Defects repaired in the ACT path network by surface type and financial year. 31014 Path Safety Hazards Addendum 1, tender 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, TCCS, released 29 July 2021, access 17 August 2021. 2.
Defects repaired in the ACT path network by surface type and financial year. 31014 Path Safety Hazards Addendum 1, tender 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, TCCS, released 29 July 2021, access 17 August 2021. 2.

% of path network maintained per annum

We can now work out repairs per kilometre.

Repairs per km of path length per annum

SurfaceFY2020FY2021
asphalt3.375.43
concrete0.420.29
Repairs per km of path length per annum. 31014 Path Safety Hazards Addendum 1, tender 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, TCCS, released 29 July 2021, access 17 August 2021. 2.

Assuming every repair is replacing 1 m of path length (the maximum patch area for cold mix is 1m2), we can make a comparison to the resurfacing targets on roads.

Repairs as a % of the total path length per annum

SurfaceFY2020FY2021
asphalt0.34%0.54%
concrete0.04%0.03%
Repairs as a % of the total path length per annum. 31014 Path Safety Hazards Addendum 1, tender 31014-RFT-01 Concrete and Asphalt Path Safety Hazards Maintenance Services, TCCS, released 29 July 2021, access 17 August 2021. 2.

Road surfacing

Territorial roads are sealed major roads that have the principal function of an avenue for movements linking town centres and suburbs. Territorial roads are defined as NAASRA (National Association of Australian State Road Authorities) Class 1,2,3 and 6. This indicator is measured using an industry standard survey that assesses one third of the territorial road network annually.

ACT Transport sets targets in terms of resurfacing territorial roads and municipal roads. Unfortunately, there is no breakdown of how long the networks is, however, there are targets. The TCCS 2019-2020 Annual Report for the financial year 2020 published data on the percentage of the territorial roads and municipal roads that were resurfaced in that year.

Acountability factortarget %actual %
Territorial roads 5%5%
Municipal roads4%4%
Transport Canberra and City Services Directorate Statement of Performance For the Year Ended 30 June 2020, TCCS 2019-2020 Annual Report, 291.

Comparison

Acountability factor asphalt roads %asphalt paths %
Territorial roads 5%0.34%
Municipal roads4%
Transport Canberra and City Services Directorate Statement of Performance For the Year Ended 30 June 2020, TCCS 2019-2020 Annual Report, 291.

The work done on roads is much greater that done on asphalt paths with 5% of territorial roads resurfaced per annum while the maintenance on asphalt paths is only 0.34% per annum in the FY2020. While this comparison is not conclusive, the order of magnitude difference would indicate path maintenance is lagging. More transparency from TCCS with better data and better accounting would help to make the differences apparent.

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