Success of programs for walking to school

child walking to school Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

ACT Health established programs to encourage walking and cycling to school in 2012. A decade later, most schools still do not participate in these programs. The participation rate for secondary schools is much lower than for primary schools. The ACT Government is slow to improve infrastructure around schools for active travel. Roads must be perceived as safe for these programs to succeed. What will it take to change this?

At face value, walking and cycling to school should be popular in Canberra as we have so many schools that are distributed across the whole of the city (figure 2). The schools are not all the same, with primary schools far more common than schools for older students (figure 3). Of course, too, we have government, private and Catholic divisions. In the last 15 years, only about a third of children walk or ride to school (figure 1). The adoption ACT Government programs to encourage active travel still have a long way to go (table 1 and figure 4).

Analysis

Data from the ACT Government’s Open Data Portal provides information on many areas of interest, including schools. We have 244 schools in the ACT and much of the population would live close enough to a school to walk or ride (see figure 2).

The ACT Government offers a number of programs to improve the health of school students, including active travel programs for both primary and secondary schools. The program along is not enough. The infrastructure around schools must be improved to make it safe for children to ride or walk to school. Active Streets is the name of this infrastructure program, which is currently underfunded.

The programs to encourage children to walk and ride to school are not new. Department of Health started the secondary and primary program in 2012 and 2015. In 2018, they were passed to TCCS. 62% of all primary schools are participating in the Ride or Walk to School program. The uptake on secondary school program It’s Your Move program is much lower at 17%. Finally, only 11% of the schools have benefitted from infrastructure improvements from the Active Streets program.

We will need to do a lot more if we want children to ride or walk to school.

How common is walking or cycling to school?

In the 1970s, most children took themselves to school. The past is another land and people live there differently. The congestion now within a kilometre of a primary school confirms that most children are chauffeured to school. Here is one study on active travel on the topic.

The ACT General Health Survey (GHS) tells us that only a third of children walk or cycle to school. We hit a peak in 2012 but it has not recovered since.

Figure 1: ACT GHS – Children who walk or cycle to school

ACT General Health Survey (GHS) – Children who walk or cycle to school, Open Data Portal dataACT, ACT Government

Many schools well located for active travel

Figure 2: The green circles show that much of Canberra has a school just 600 m away. 171 of the 244 schools in Canberra are shown on this map.

Much of Canberra has a school just 600 m away. Data ACT Data Portal, access 16 September 2021, Map: OpenStreetMap contributors and MapCite.com
Data: Data Schools in the ACT – archived, ACT Data Portal, accessed 22 March 2022, Map: OpenStreetMap contributors and MapCite.com

Schools for senior years – secondary and college – are generally much bigger than primary schools. For this reason, primary schools are much more numerous. Travel to a secondary school or college is also likely be a greater distance. This may not bother a cyclist, however, public transport be more attractive than walking for others.

Figure 3: Breakdown of schools by type in the ACT

Data: Data Schools in the ACT – archived, ACT Data Portal, accessed 22 March 2022.

School programs to promote active travel

The ACT Government offers school programs for both primary and secondary schools to encourage active travel – walking or riding to school.

Legend:

  • Ride or Walk to School (RWTS) – primary schools
  • It’s Your Move (IYM) – secondary schools
  • It’s Your Move Safe Cycle (IYMSC) – secondary schools
  • Active Streets – all ages

Table 1: Schools participating in active travel programs

programparticipatingmissing%type
RWTS684162%primary
IYM2228%secondary
IYMSC42017%secondary
Active Streets2821611%all
Data: Program delivery: ACT Data Portal, accessed 16 September 2021, and School type totals:Data Schools in the ACT – archived, ACT Data Portal, accessed 22 March 2022

Figure 4: Schools participating in active travel programs. BLUE shows the schools participating compared to the number of schools that are not.

Data: Program delivery: ACT Data Portal, accessed 16 September 2021, and School type totals: Data Schools in the ACT – archived, ACT Data Portal, accessed 22 March 2022

TCCS fails for our school kids

Mr David Matthews, Executive Group Manager, Education Directorate, reported to the Standing Committee on Education and Community Inclusion the glaring inadequacy of the infrastructure around schools. canberra.bike has published many articles about the challenges our children face walking and riding to schools. The community irritation can be seen in the flood of ACT Legislative Assembly e-Petitions for traffic calming (LATM in TCCS speak).

Talk is cheap, however. Minister Steel should drop the platitudes and instead take action with adequate funding. We would rather spend hundreds of millions duplicating roads than improving the infrastructure around our schools.

Recommendation 31

“5.109 While there is a glaring need for better drive-through and ‘kiss-and-drop arrangements’ several schools have experienced only negligible improvements in traffic and parking from the traffic management plans and active travel routes developed by Transport Canberra City Services.” 233

Managing ACT School Infrastructure, Standing Committee on Education and Community Inclusion, May 2022, Report 3, 56.

233 Mr David Matthews, Executive Group Manager, Education Directorate, Committee Hansard, 7 March 2022, p. 135

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