Shorts: real and perceived fears

We must recognise that in low cycling countries our fears have a large impact on our cycling behaviour and our instincts (feelings) are poorly tuned to the real risk of cycling. To increase women’s cycling participation, we must therefore target building confidence and providing women with real cycling experience. This equates to an adaption process of venturing to try the unfamiliar and building new habits. A positive experience (enjoyment) makes it more likely that we will cycle again. A mishap in the early stages will discourage further cycling. This is why good cycle infrastructure makes a difference, as it creates a forgiving environment to cycle.

City ranking for cycling: US style.

City rankings can be motivational but unlikely to help city planners prioritise investment decisions. Bicycle Transport Analysis is a basket model for scoring cities for the suitability of cycling from the US. Canberra does very well in this ranking, but the first impression is deceptive as we are comparing ourselves with another LOW cycling country and not a good one like the Netherlands.

Cycling facts from the Netherlands where cycling is common

Australia comes in last in this country comparison of bicycle use as a percentage of total number of trips. This will be uncomfortable for many Australians, but Australia is certainly a LOW cycling country. Much will need to be done to encourage cycling in Australia. Few ride in Australia, so it is worth looking at a country where they do.

Section 3.5 Seasonal variations in cycling

Canberra has four seasons but do we change our cycling habits over the year? It would be good to know.