Canberra Centenary Trail: Taylor to Forde

The section of Canberra Centenary Trail along the border with NSW overlooks Gungahlin and winds its way amongst rural hills The Canberra Centenary Trail is an adventure – walking, riding or any other way. The ACT Environment’s website is hopelessly out of date – do not let that put you off.

Canberra cycling planner

There are many ways to plan your route around Canberra. Here are a few suggestions. If you want to plan a ride around Canberra, you will need a good map. After that, a route suggestion could be useful. Here both are discussed.

Hill climbs of interest in the suburbs

Some love hills. There is satisfaction found climbing a hill and the reward of a magnificent view at the top. The ride down is a real thrill. Here are suggest hill climbs that lie in the heart of the suburbs.

Canberra Centenary Trail without the suburbs

The Canberra Centenary Trail (CCT) is a nice ride with the exception that so much is through the suburbs. Without directional signage through the suburbs, Komoot will be required to find our way. Canberra.bike suggests that we may as well stay on dirt roads.

Canberra Centenary Trail with the bus

Using the ACT Rapid Bus service to get to the track heads. The Canberra Centenary Trail is 140 km long. Most people will not ride it in one go. One trick is to break it up into multiple stages and to do a different section on different days. The question now is how to get to the track head and home again at the end of the ride. Canberra.bike suggests taking the bike on a Canberra Rapid Bus. The terminus stations are a base camp for the rides.

Mount Rob Roy: alone but not forgotten

Mount Tennent, Honeysuckle Creek and Mount Rob Roy belong to the great hill climbs in the south. Mount Tennent, south of Tharwa, is usually walked but it can be run. Honeysuckle Creek is a popular road ride (the road is currently closed), and Mount Rob Roy a gravel ascent on Banks Steep Track management trail.

West of Stromlo: ride on the far side

Riding on the west slopes of Mount Stromlo along a serpentine route with views of the Brindabella Ranges. Mount Stromlo Forest is a large reserve on the slopes of Mount Stromlo. West of the mountain, many creeks run off undulating hills into the Murrumbidgee River, and have cut into the clay to form deep creek beds.

Black Mountain: too big to miss

Black Mountain forest, close to Civic, is rarely explored. The north and west slopes of the mountain offer excellent cycling on formed vehicle trails. Beautiful walking trails crisscross the mountain.