Molonglo 3 East: topography

The topography of Molonglo 3 East demands a reframing of the way planning is done in the ACT. Best practices that apply to the Molonglo valley are not support by the Estate Development Code, Single and Multi-Unit Housing Development Codes and the zoning codes in the Territory Plan. Molonglo 3 East is something new and exciting that will push ACT planing towards an outcomes planning mechanism.

Gradients in Molonglo 3: cycling from John Gorton Drive Bridge

Bicycles are arguably the most efficient machine ever invented, however, everything has its limits. A 30m section of steep path is all that is required to bring a cyclist to a stop. Pushing a bike up steep paths is not popular amongst cyclists. Better is to build the paths so that they are never so steep to become unrideable. Austroads Standards tell us how. Hilly terrain requires careful route and path design.

Building unrideable bike paths

Many of the problems we have with active travel are due to years and years and year of poor design. The Molonglo Valley is a good example. In Whitlam, the ACT Government is building a bike path with a gradient of 12.4% (200m, climb 24m). This is not compliant with the Austroads AGRD06A standard – and only determined and athletic types will love it.

Mount Majura: highest of the city peaks

Mount Majura Road is an interesting CAT 3 hill climb. Going up is a fitness challenge. Going down the Mineshaft Descent is a challenge for the nerves. If you like hills this is a good ride. Mount Majura is part of Canberra Nature Park.

Mount Rob Roy: alone but not forgotten

Mount Tennent, Honeysuckle Creek and Mount Rob Roy belong to the great hill climbs in the south. Mount Tennent, south of Tharwa, is usually walked but it can be run. Honeysuckle Creek is a popular road ride (the road is currently closed), and Mount Rob Roy a gravel ascent on Banks Steep Track management trail.