Canberra Centenary Trail: Taylor to Forde

The section of Canberra Centenary Trail along the border with NSW overlooks Gungahlin and winds its way amongst rural hills The Canberra Centenary Trail is an adventure – walking, riding or any other way. The ACT Environment’s website is hopelessly out of date – do not let that put you off.

The Pinnacle behind Hawker on gravel

The Pinnacle in Canberra Nature Park is very pretty and undulating – perfect for recreation cycling. The Pinnacle Nature Reserve lies on the hill behind Hawker. It is part of Canberra Nature Park. A ride around the edge of the reserves along the management trails is about 11 km in length. A good walk but only a short ride.

Cycling commuting in Canberra

Rushing off to work in the morning is familiar to everybody. Riding to work is enjoyable and good for our health. Getting there quickly and on time greatly matters. Considerable thought goes into getting to work. The routes between town centres are the most important ones and form cycle highways. This project focuses on the needs of commuting cyclists and the infrastructure they use daily.

Denman Prospect and Stromlo West

Riding the western slopes of Mount Stromlo. A gravel ride from Denman Prospect shops, to Stromlo Forest and across its western slopes. The route winds its way over hills and across creeks, with uninterrupted views of the Murrumbidgee Valley and the Brindabella Range. The ride is 25.7 km, a 500 m rise, hilly, and with no locked gates. A mountain bike is recommended.

Molonglo and Murrumbidgee views: Stockdill Drive

A sunset ride on Stockdill Drive is one of the best things you can do. The road suddenly ends, which discourages traffic. Apart from a farm or two, nobody lives there. You will pass the Woodstock Nature Reserve and Shepherd Lookout along the way – a lot to see in just 3.4 km.

West of Stromlo: ride on the far side

Riding on the west slopes of Mount Stromlo along a serpentine route with views of the Brindabella Ranges. Mount Stromlo Forest is a large reserve on the slopes of Mount Stromlo. West of the mountain, many creeks run off undulating hills into the Murrumbidgee River, and have cut into the clay to form deep creek beds.