FOI 20-013 Walking and Cycling feasibility and options report

The Walking and cycling feasibility and options report prepared by AECOM continues on where the strategic work 2012-2014 left off. The ACT Strategic Cycle Network Plan prioritises routes between town and group centre for development. The AECOM report considers the challenges of building a cycle path along these routes.

Woden light rail terminus: no bike paths

In Europe, one common way to get to the nearest light rail stop is with the bike. All you need is a path, dedicated bike parking area when you get there. Woden light rail terminus won’t offer any of that.

Woden Valley 1989: ahead of its time

Woden Valley was built in the 1960s. By 1989 it already had many of the bike paths we know today. It was ahead of its time. Photos from 30 years ago, that could be from yesterday.

Heysen Street to Woden Town Centre

The Heysen Street Link bike path will be extended to Woden Town Centre. Good news, after years of delays. The scope of projects often shrinks after grand announcements, but Heysen Street Link has grown to something more. A happy end.

2017 ACT Household Travel Survey: overview

The 2017 ACT Household Travel Survey shows that the daily commute is typically one of the longest journeys we make in our daily lives. Schools, shops, doctors and sport are usually in the local area, and then the distance travel is almost always shorter. A survey of Canberrans’ cycling habits from 2017.

Tuggeranong to Woden commuting

Documenting cycling routes in the ACT between town centres. Optimal routes are rare, but there are better routes. People have different cycling preferences. Road riding and off-road cycling are found here. Road lanes and bike paths may not be continuous but there is usually enough to make a worthwhile route.

Woden to Civic commuting

Documenting cycling routes in the ACT between town centres. Optimal routes are rare, but there are better routes. People have different cycling preferences. Road riding and off-road cycling are found here. Road lanes and bike paths may not be continuous but there is usually enough to make a worthwhile route.

Built to last a generation: rapid change, then stability

Everybody has seen it, knows it, but we forget it. We build our cities for the long term. The rapid construction of new suburbs is followed by long periods of stability and much later a wave of renewal. This cycle can take 40 to 50 years, or the period of many people’s working lifetime. For a city, a person’s life span is a blink of an eye.